The Mat Eric Hart Japan Collection
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A collection of digital audio recordings made in Japan between August - October 2019, this project was supported by the British Library’s Sound Archive. The collection explores the relationship that exists between sound and spirituality in Japanese culture, documenting present day practices, rituals, performances and interactions with Japanese artists, festivals, folk culture and sacred spaces.

The collection is available to listen to free of charge through the British Library Sound Archive's Listening Service.

Alternatively, please enjoy this selection of recordings from the collection by using the menu on the left hand side of this page to navigate.

 Aomori Nebuta Matsuri 

 青森ねぶた祭り 

 

Aomori Nebuta Matsuri  [ねぶた祭] is a traditional summer festival which takes place in the city of Aomori in the northern region of Tōhoku.

 

Large washi-paper lantern floats are pushed by participants along a parade route in the city centre.

 

accompanied by groups of musicians known as hayashi [囃子], who perform using a variety of traditional Japanese instruments.

 

Participants of all ages perform a traditional dance whilst chanting  "Rasserā" [ラッセラー]

 

calling upon visitors and spectators to join them in their celebrations.

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 Hirosaki Neputa Matsuri 

 弘前ねぷたまつり 

 

Hirosaki Neputa Matsuri [弘前ねぷたまつり] is similar in structure and layout to the Aomori Nebuta Matsuri but as it takes places in the smaller sized  

city of Hirosaki, roughly 50km south of Aomori, it is considered as having more of local community inspired atmosphere.

 

Among the variety of traditional Japanese instruments, including three large Ōdaiko (meaning big drum) drums native to Hirosaki;

 

they are named Tsugaru Joppari Ōdaiko, Tsugaru Go Joppari Ōdaiko and Dotten Daiko.

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 Tsugaru Shamisens - Kazusangenkai 

 津軽三味線 

 

Recording of live performance by three members of a local Tsugaru shamisen [津軽三味線] group called Kazusangenkai [和三絃会].

 

The performance took place inside Hirosaki JR train station.

The Tsugaru shamisen is a type of shamisen (a three stringed traditional japanese instrument), used to play music of this particular style

 

which is native to the Tsugaru area of Aomori Prefecture.

tsurugaoka%20hachimang%C5%AB_edited.jpg

 Risshu-sai Ceremony 

 立秋祭 

 

Risshu-sai is a Shinto ceremony that takes place at Tsurugaoka Hachimangū (鶴岡八幡宮) shrine in Kamakura.

 

The ceremony marks the arrival of Autumn, when prayers are offered to Kami [神], the deities and spirits venerated in the religion of Shinto.

 

The ritual features traditional Japanese classical music known as Gagaku [雅楽]

 

 and a sacred folk dance known as Kagura [神楽] which is performed by young girls known as Miko [巫女] or shrine maidens.

 

From the surrounding forest can be heard wildlife sounds of the large brown cicada known as abura-zemi (油蝉) (graptopsaltria nigrofuscata) and the

 

black kite known as tonbi (とんび) (milvus migrans).

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 Kotoko x Mat Eric Hart 

 Live at Callas 

 

Recording of live performance by Kotoko and Mat Eric Hart at Callas Café & Bar in Tokyo on August 10th 2019.

 
Zaimokuza%20Beach%20%235_edited.jpg

 Zaimokuza Beach

材木座海岸 

Zaimokuza beach is one of many beaches situated along the Kamakura coastline of Sagami Bay.

Listen to the gentle waves arriving at the shore amongst the late afternoon ambience.

Yamabushi%20at%20Daishobo_edited.jpg

 Yamabushi 

 山伏  

 

The word Yamabushi expresses "one who bows down on the mountain". They are mountain ascetics with beliefs founded in the ancient Japanese

 

religion of Shugendō - an intensely embodied path of awakening that combines esoteric Buddhist practice, Shinto awareness of the sacredness of

 

nature, Daoist teachings, and outdoor asceticism such as mountain pilgrimage. 

This series of intimate recordings was made after being invited to stay with a group of Yamabushi during one of their annual training sessions held at

 

Daishōbō pilgrim lodge, at the foot of the sacred Mt. Haguro in Tsuruoka, Yamagata Prefecture.

 

Daishōbō is the home of Master Fumihiro Hoshino, a 13th generation Yamabushi priest who has dedicated his life to living as a Yamabushi,

 

introducing many people from all over the world to its mystical culture and heritage.

This is a recording of Master Fumihiro Hoshino formally initiating Yamabushi training during his introduction ceremony.

 

He addresses each training participant during a roll call, which they reply to with the Yamabushi customary

 

"Uketamou"  which can be interpreted as meaning "I humbly accept with an open heart.".

The opening ceremony session took place just after noon. Master Hoshino can be heard reciting prayers and then commencing chanting with the

 

sitting Yamabushi training participants. Master Hoshino is seated facing the group (consisting of 24 persons) and moves between this position and the

 

shrine behind him, referred to as shinden (神殿), whilst performing various rituals.  Master Hoshino can be heard shaking a cermonial Ōnusa (大幣), a

 

wooden wand with paper streamers often used in Shinto rituals, before ringing a bell known as Furisuzu (振鈴). Group chanting then commences.

As it is summer, the shōji doors surrounding the main lodge are all opened and as such there is significant noise from the surrounding forest, most 

 

notably the large brown cicada known as abura-zemi (油蝉) (graptopsaltria nigrofuscata).

An evening chanting session takes place at Daishõbõ Lodge with Master Hoshino leads the collective chanting.

 

The singing of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma) can be heard in the background.

Mt_edited_edited.jpg

 Mt. Haguro 

 羽黒山 

 

Mount Haguro (羽黒山, Haguro-san) is one of the Three Sacred Mountains of Dewa in the city of Tsuruoka, the ancient province of Dewa 

 

(a domain consisting of modern-day Yamagata Prefecture and Akita Prefecture). Of the Three Sacred Mountains, it is where the Yamabushi believe the

 

troubles of the present world are overcome.

Entering Mt. Haguro you can feel a sudden change in the air as you pass through the Zuishin Gate at the entrance and arrive at the Shinkyo bridge

 

(a curved wooden bridge that signifies the traditional border into the sacred land).

 

The flow of the Haraigawa river echoes through the forest of great cedars in harmony with the distinct singing chorus of the evening cicada known as

 

higurashi (茅蜩) (tanna japonensis).

Suganotaki Falls (須賀の滝) at the base of Mt. Haguro. 

Standing in front of the ancient Grandpa cedar tree known as jijisugi (爺杉), the distant flow of the Haraigawa river and the

 

evening chorus of the higurashi (茅蜩) and abura-zemi (油蝉) create a magical, vibrant soundscape unique to this mountain's magical, ancient forest.

The sound of rainfall in the forest...

The Minami Dami waterfall, hidden away in the depths of the Mt.Haguro forest.

The Yamabushi conch known as a horagai [法螺貝] echoes through the Mt. Haguro forest.

 

The distinct sound of wooden walking sticks known as kongojo (金剛杖) and mochisuzu (蟋蟀) bells can be heard rattling the 2,446 stone step

 

stairway which leads to the summit of Mt. Haguro. 

The Yamabushi arrive at the summit of Mt. Haguro. The blowing of the horagai [法螺貝] is followed by chanting outside Sanjingosaiden shrine.

 

Master Hoshino leads the chanting accompanied by his furisuzu (振鈴) and shakujo (錫杖). We also hear the distinct singing of the cicada known

 

as min-min-zemi (ミンミンゼミ) (hyalessa maculaticollis).

 
Hongaku-ji%20Temple_edited.jpg

Recording of the Yamabushi arriving at the summit of Mt. Haguro. The blowing of the horagai [法螺貝] is followed by Yamabushi chanting outside

 

Sanjingosaiden shrine. Master Hoshino leads the chanting accompanied by his furisuzu (振鈴) and shakujo (錫杖).

 

The sounds of the surrounding Mt.Haguro forest can be heard including the distinct singing of the cicada known as min-min-zemi (ミンミンゼミ)

 

(hyalessa maculaticollis).

 Hongaku-ji Temple

 本覚寺  

Hongaku-ji is a Buddhist temple of the Nichiren sect situated in Kamakura.

 

This evening prayer ceremony was conducted by two priests of the temple in the Ebisudō (Ebisu hall).

 

Both priests were chanting whilst one of the priests accompanied on the keisu (磬子) (singing bowl) and mokugyo (木魚) (wooden fish).

The gentle trickling sound of water. A chōzuya (手水舎) is used by worshippers to purify themselves before approaching the main temple.

 
Hasedera%20Temple%20%231_edited.jpg

Recording of evening prayer ceremony held at Hongaku-ji (本覚寺) Temple in Kamakura.

 

Hongaku-ji is a Buddhist temple of the Nichiren sect. The ceremony was conducted by two priests of the temple in the Ebisudō (Ebisu hall).

 

Both priests were chanting whilst one of the priests accompanied on the keisu (磬子) (singing bowl) and mokugyo (木魚) (wooden fish).

 Hase-dera Temple

 海光山慈照院長谷寺 

 Hase-dera (長谷寺) is a Buddhist temple of the Jodo sect situated in the city of Kamakura. 

 

This is a recording of the Shoro Belfry Bonshō (梵鐘) bell situated inside the temple's grounds.

 

A priest of the temple can be heard ringing the bell and reciting a prayer as rain falls softly in the surrounding gardens.

 The morning prayer ceremony is performed in the Kannon-do Hall directly at the foot of the temple's famous 30ft Kannon statue, made from ancient

wood and gilted in gold. It is performed by four priests of the temple, two of whom can be heard chanting,

 

accompanied by keisu (磬子), taiko (太鼓), hyōshigi (拍子木) and mokugyo (木魚).

 
Enoshima%20Daishi%20Goma%20Ceremony%20%2

 This is a recording of the morning ceremony performed each day in the Kannon-do Hall directly at the foot of the temple's famous

 

30ft Kannon statue made of wood and gilted in  gold. It is performed by four priests of the temple, two of whom can be heard chanting, accompanied

 

by keisu (磬子), taiko (太鼓), hyōshigi (拍子木) and mokugyo (木魚).

 Goma Ceremony 

 護摩  

Goma is a Shingon Buddhist ceremony at Enoshima Daishi temple (江の島大師) situated on Enoshima Island in which a consecrated fire burns inside

 

the temple's main hall in front of the temple's large Acala statue - which is blackened by the smoke.

 

The ritual is performed by the temple's head priest. The ritual is performed for the purpose of destroying negative energies,

 

detrimental thoughts and desires, and for the making of secular requests and blessings.

 
Koenji%20Awa%20Odori%20%238_edited.jpg

 Recording of Goma ceremony (護摩) at Enoshima Daishi temple. Goma is a Shingon Buddhist ceremony in which a consecrated fire burns inside the

 

temple's main hall in front of the temple's large Acala statue - blackened by the smoke. The ritual is performed by the temple's head priest and fellow

 

priests with participants chanting whilst accompanied by tsuri-daiko and keiso. The ritual is performed for the purpose of destroying negative

 

energies, detrimental thoughts and desires, and for the making of secular requests and blessings.

 

 Koenji Awa Odori 

 高円寺阿波おどり 

Kōenji Awa Odori Festival (高円寺阿波おどり) is a summer street festival which features thousands of dancers, musicians and performers organised

 

into various troupes known as Ren (連). Performers wear traditional obon dance costumes, and chant and sing as they parade through the streets of

 

the Tokyo suburb Kōenji as spectators watch from the sidewalks.

 

 
Ofuna%20Kannonji%20Temple_edited.jpg

 Ofuna Kannon-ji Temple 

 大船観音寺 

 Ōfuna Kannonji (大船観音寺) is a Buddhist temple of the Sōtō school of Zen. The noon prayer ceremony at ceremony is performed inside the great

 

25m tall white concrete statue of the bodhisattva Kannon. Performed alone by one of the temple's priests, Shoubou Sakurai, who chants whilst

 

accompanying himself playing keisu (磬子) and tsuri-daiko (太鼓).

 

 
Nameri%2520river_edited_edited.jpg

 Recording of the noon prayer ceremony at Ōfuna Kannonji (大船観音寺), a Buddhist temple of the Sōtō school of Zen.

 

The ceremony is performed alone inside the great 25m tall white concrete statue of the bodhisattva Kannon

 

by one of the temple's priests, Shoubou Sakurai,who chants whilst accompanying himself playing keisu (磬子) and tsuri-daiko (太鼓).

 

 Nameri River 

 滑川 

 The flow of the Nameri river stream at night in Kamakura, accompanied by the singing of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus Emma).

 

 
kendo_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Kendo

 剣道 

Recording of a series of Kendo (剣道) matches which took place during a demonstration tournament held at

 

Sanjingosaiden (三神合祭殿) shrine at the summit of Mt.Haguro.

 

 Kendo fighters perform a range of techniques equipped with wooden bamboo swords known as shinai (竹刀). T

 

he singing of a variety of different species of semi (蝉) (cicadas) can be heard coming from the forest surrounding the shrine.

 

Aki-no-mine%20Ceremony%20%2314_edited.jp

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Aki-no-mine 

 秋の峰入 

 

Aki-no-mine (秋乃峰), also referred to as the Autumn Peak RItual, is one of the most important annual rituals for Yamabushi.

Held at Prince Hachiko shrine, situated at the summit of the sacred Mt. Haguro, every year around 150 Yamabushi from all over the world gather to

take part in this sacred ritual which signifies "the journey to rebirth".

The Hassaku Ritual marks this moment, as the Aki-no-mine training reaches its climax. 

 

Yamabushi arrive ascending the stone step stairway of Mt. Haguro, their horagai (法螺貝) conches sounding from deep within the Mt. Haguro forest.

 

The Hassaku Ritual continues...

 

Yamabushi chanting in unison. Their voices travelling far into the forest night...

 

The next day the Yamabushi descend Mt. Haguro and are greeted with lit torches at Zuishin gate (which lies at the entrance to Mt. Haguro)

 

by a crowd of local villagers who cheer them on the final leg of their Aki-no-mine journey.

 

The Yamabushi pass through the village of Haguromachi, their proud voices resonant!

 

But before we leave... one last song from this magical realm. A song sung by an elder Yamabushi monk, now retired and selling his tea

from a small wooden shack at the summit of Mt. Haguro.

 
Dohara-no-taki%20%231_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Dohara-no-taki 

 胴腹滝 

Recording of Dohara-no-taki  (胴腹滝) waterfall at the base of Mt. Chōkai.

 

At the beginning of the recording, a visitor can be heard ringing the Suzu (鈴) bell located at this spiritual site.

 

Dohara-no-taki features two natural spring waterfalls side by side, and is located roughly half way up Mt.Chōkai (鳥海山), an active volcano on the

 

border between Akita and Yamagata Prefectures.

Dokeiji%20Temple%20%237_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Dokeiji Temple 

 同慶寺 

 

Dokeiji Temple (同慶寺), is an 800-year old Sōtō Zen temple situated in the Odaka district of Minamisōma, Fukushima Prefecture.

Sitting on the steps of the temple, an orchestra of semi (蝉) can be heard singing in the temple's surrounding woodland,

 

most noteably the singing of he tsuku-tsuku-boushi (ツクツクボウシ) (meimuna opalifera).

The head priest of Dokeiji temple - Tokuun Tanaka - gathers old stupa (卒塔婆), wooden relics decorated with inscriptions

 

that are found attombs in Japanese cemeteries, to burn in the temple's grounds.

As the fire dies down, Tokuun searches for his acoustic guitar which he keeps in his temple.

He begins to play a song called "Itsukushimi" (慈しみ) - a word that can be interpreted as compassion, love and mercy.

Surrounding by the mid-afternoon chorus of semi, we join them in song...

The sound of the evening Bonshō bell, which sounds everyday at 18:00pm.

The sound of the morning Bonshō bell, which sounds everyday at 06:00am.

After the morning bell, a morning prayer ceremony is held in Dokeiji Temple's Butsu-dō (main hall) and performed by head monk Tokuun Tanaka.

Accompanying his chanting, he also plays the Keisu (磬子)  (singing bowl), mokugyo (木魚) (wooden fish) and hyōshigi (拍子木) (wooden blocks).

On our final evening together, Tokuun plays once more his song "Itsukushimi" in the quiet still of night. 

The faint echo of kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma) can be heard emanating from the woodland surrounding Dokeiji Temple.

Tobiu%20Camp%20%232_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 TOBIU Camp Art Festival 

 トビウ 

 

TOBIU Camp Art Festival takes place in the forest outside the small village of Shiraoi Town in Hokkaido. 

The festival takes place once-a-year with a variety of artists working together to creat a fairy-tale world view through a wide range of expressions

 

including art, music, Ainu traditional songs and dances, dance performances, and plays created with festival attendee, using an abandoned

 

elementary school and its surrounding forest as an exhibition venue.

Kapiw&Apappo (カピウ-アパッポ/) are two sisters from Lake Akan. They sing songs that have been handed down from their grandmother and their

 

hometown of Akan since they were children, and also use folk instruments such as the Mukkuri (ムックリ) (Ainu jaw harp) and the

 

Tonkori (トンコリ) (Ainu stringed instrument) to convey the charm of Ainu songs.

 

KAPIW means "seagull" and APAPPO means "flower" in the Ainu language.  

OKI is an Asankara (Asahikawa) Ainu, and a player of the traditional Karafuto Ainu string instrument, the Tonkori (トンコリ). 

 

He is a musician and producer who has carved out his own style of music by creating innovative sounds based on Ainu traditions,

 

and has made the unknown charms of Ainu music known both in Japan and abroad. 

Here he performs with his wife Rekpo, a singer of Ainu traditional songs.

Toshiji Mikawa and Junji Hirose are two noise artists who performed a live improvised session. 

 

Mikawa performs with a series of synthesisers, pedals and electronics with Hirose on tenor saxophone and his own self-made sound instrument

 

(SSI Self-Made Sound Instrument).

Nonoko Yoshida is a Hokkaido born saxophonist performing here with the experimental Tokyo band MERMORT.

Haruhiko Saga is a master of throat singing and the traditional mongolian instrument known as morin khuur - or horsehead fiddle (морин хуур).

Ainu%20Art%20Project%20Rehearsal%20%232_

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Ainu Art Project 

 アイヌアートプロジェクト 

 

Ainu Art Project is a group of musicians of Ainu descent who explore and express both traditional and contemporary elements of Ainu culture.

 

This performance rehearsal was held at Sapporo Pirka Kotan, an Ainu culture promotion centre on the outskirts of Sapporo city.

 
Cafe%20To%20ov%20Sapporo%20-%20Ikuro%20T

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Ikuro Takahashi x Mat Eric Hart 

 Live at TO OV Café, Sapporo 

 

Recording of Ikuro Takahashi performing a live improvisation at TO OV Café in Sapporo.

 

Takahashi holds a detuned snare drum in his hands whilst controlling a series of bells connected by string placed around the room which he controls

 

using his feet. The performance was part of an evening hosted by café owner Kazunori Nakamura and local artist Yuki Ikoshi and also featured live  

 

performances by myself and local artist Hiroto Hayashi. 

 
kurosaki_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Orasho 

オラショのお祈り 

 Mr. Shigenori Murakami is an elderly gentleman whose ancestors were kakure kirishitan (隠れキリシタン) or hidden Christians, Japanese who

 

practiced Christianity underground after the Tokugawa Shogunate banned Christianity in 1620, many of whom were natvies of the southern island of

 

Kyushu. It was only until after the Meiji restoration (1868) that Chrisitianity was re-established.

 

Here, Mr. Shigenori Murakami recites ancient Orasho prayers at his home in Kurosaki, Fukuoka Prefecture.

 

Orasho is a loanword derived from the Latin word for prayer - oratio.

Takachiho%20Gorge%20%233_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Takachiho Gorge 

 高千穂峡  

 

Takachiho Gorge (高千穂峡) is an ancient natural landscape. A narrow chasm cut through surrounding volcanic rock by the Gokase river.

Amanoiwato%20Shrine%20%231_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Iwato River  

(岩戸川) 

 

The flow of the Iwato river (岩戸川) outside Amano Yasugawara Shrine (天安河原). I

 

t is considered a very spiritual place and home to one of the best known legends of Japanese mythology -

 

the story of the Shinto sun goddess Amaterasu.

Amanoiwato%20Shrine%20%231_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Tsuyazaki 

 津屋崎  

 

Tsuyazaki is a small coastal town in Fukuoka Prefecture. It is a quiet, peaceful place.

 

Listen to the sound of the sea waves arriving softly on the shore of Tsuyazaki Beach (津屋崎海水浴場).

 Tamanoi is a 100+ years old traditional ryokan (旅館) (Japanese inn) in the seaside town of Tsuyazaki. The proprietor, Fuminori Abe, lives and works

 

here alone. After being invited to visit, I spoke with Mr. Abe. During our conversation, Mr. Abe selects a CD to play over his soundsystem

 

Ryuichi Sakamoto's DNA from the 2004 Japanese film soundtrack to "Tony Takitani".

 
tsurugaoka%20hachimang%C5%AB_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Soreisha-shuki-reisai Ceremony 

 津屋崎  

Recording of Soreisha-shuki-reisai (祖霊社秋季例祭) ceremony, also referred to as the Ancestral Shrine Autumn Ceremony) at Tsurugaoka Hachimangū

 

shrine in Kamakura. It is a Shinto ceremony that marks the Autumn Equinox.

 

The ceremony features traditional Japanese classical music called Gagaku [雅楽] which is accompanied by the chanting of a shrine priest.

 
Obama%20Beach_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Hayama Beach 

 大浜海岸 

Sagami Bay waterfront ambience at Hayama Beach, Hayama, Kanagawa Prefecture.

 

A small motor-driven fishing boat can be heard pulling into the beach, returning with the day's catch.

 
Bar%20LSD%20-%20Matthew%20Eric%20Hart%20

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Bar LSD x Mat Eric Hart 

Recording of live performance by myself at the Bar LSD venue in Tokyo. 

 
Sachiko%20Yoshihara%20%234_edited.jpg

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Koto 

 箏 

 

The koto (箏) is a Japanese plucked half-tube zither instrument, and the national instrument of Japan.

Sachiko Yoshihara is a koto player and teacher, performing here at her mother's home studio in the Tokyo suburb of Mikawashima.

Japanese%20Calligraphy%20-%20Hiromi%20Ed

 The Nameri River (滑川, Nameri-gawa) is a river which flows through Kamakura.

 

This recording was made late at night, at a spot close to where the river's flow meets the open sea. 

 

Accompanied by the gentle night chorus of field crickets or kōrogi (蟋蟀) (teleogryllus emma).

 Shodo  

 書道  

 

Shodō (書道) is a form of Japanese calligraphy and is one of the oldest and most profound traditional art forms in Japan.

Shodō is an art to express one's thoughts, emotions and messages in the form of characters and words.

 

 This recording was made during a calligraphy introduction by teacher and artist Hiromi Edo at her home studio in Ōmachi, Kamakura.

 

Here, she discusses the techniques, principles, history and culture of calligraphy.